Posts Tagged With: teacher training

Have you been Challenged Lately?!

Categories: Alignment, Anatomy, Asana, instagram challenge, Inversions, Sanskrit, sequencing, teacher training, yoga challenge | Tags: , , , , , , ,

Three Block Headstand

Yes, getting into headstand can be intimidating. You’re not alone if you’re looking around your yoga class thinking, How will I ever do that? Invert your perception with this exclusive three block headstand sequence from Jennifer Elliott, designed for both beginner and seasoned yogis, to safely support your neck and back as you build your foundation for a rock star headstand:

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I tend to avoid headstands anymore because of neck issues I have resulting from a car accident. As a teacher, I’ve found that most people have trouble setting up the foundation of headstand properly, and put themselves at risk of injury. For those reasons I love this version with 3 blocks and the wall. Personally, I can get into headstand without aggravating my neck, and as a teacher I feel confident that I’m setting up my students for a successful inversion.

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Categories: Alignment, Anatomy, Asana, Inversions, teacher training | Tags: , , , , ,

Book Peru by Dec. 31st and receive a $500 Amex card!

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Categories: Alignment, Anatomy, Asana, meditation, Philosophy, Pranayama, Sanskrit, sequencing, teacher training, yogaworks | Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

July Instagram Challenge #tak8it2thenextlevel

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Categories: Alignment, Asana, meditation, Sanskrit, sequencing, Video, yogaworks | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

5 reasons everyone should take a Yoga Teacher Training and they have nothing to do with becoming a teacher

For most people when they hear about a teacher training, they think that it’s not for them.  Trainings can bring doubt about your skill level and age, whether you’d like to teach or not. But teacher training is more than that; it’s an investment in you. Here are a few reasons why.

  1. To ask questions

Have you ever been in class and had questions for the teacher? Most of the time it’s not appropriate to ask while they’re teaching and you may not always have a chance to chat with the teacher after class. This can be frustrating, and even cause injury if you’re doing something wrong.

During teacher training, students are encouraged to ask questions to further discussions about the physical postures or philosophy. Oftentimes other students will have the same questions, which can be comforting to know that you weren’t the only one who wondered that! Essentially, it’s like having several private sessions, but with other students which may give you different perspectives.

  1. To learn the proper alignment

Even advanced students can benefit from learning about alignment. Many students that end up in higher level classes may have only taken a few of the basics classes and then jumped into a 2/3. These classes are faster with fewer instructions and not always a lot of opportunities for adjustments. This is an injury waiting to happen.

In teacher training, we learn the anatomy of the body so we understand how bones should align and what muscles to consciously engage. We also look at different body types and address injuries so that we see that a “correct” pose for one person, does not work for another. These modifications can help avoid injuries, as well as teach you how to take your pose deeper when you’re ready. This can be especially gratifying for advanced students; just like when you reread a book and see something new, your practice will begin to become fine tuned with your new information and understanding.

  1. To learn the terminology

Have you ever been to a class where the teacher only used the Sanskrit name for pose? Half the time you were looking around to see what you should do. This can be very distracting and draws your attention away from the meditative aspects of your practice.

Once you understand the root meaning of the Sanskrit words, class becomes much easier. No longer do you need to crank your head around to see what pose your teacher is calling out. Being more comfortable with this new language allows you to relax and turn inward, putting your attention onto being more present.

  1. To understand the philosophy

It’s common for a yoga teacher to spout out some philosophy tid bits during class. Have you ever wanted to learn more than that? What book did that quote come from? What do the chants mean? How do you meditate? Does any of this conflict with your religious beliefs?

These are common questions that students have and a typical group class won’t be able to fully address. Through class discussions and further reading, you can begin to develop a better understanding of the history and philosophy of yoga. You will quickly learn that this will be just the beginning of your personal journey with these concepts.

  1. To build a community

Most of the time we run into class and plop our mat down and the second it’s over we run out the door. Unfortunately, this has to do with our busy lifestyles. But what is the point of practicing in a group instead of by yourself, if you’re not going to connect with those around you? With everyone in their own world anyway, you may feel intimidated trying to begin conversations or make new friends.

During the training you have the opportunity to meet your fellow students. You can get to know them better when we break into discussions, work in partners, or study groups. This is a great way to meet like minded people, and often these become lasting friendships.

Teacher trainings are really for all levels of students. Yoga is about meeting yourself where you are and moving forward from that point. It’s a lifelong journey, an investment in yourself and a stepping stone to the life you want to live!

Categories: Alignment, Anatomy, Asana, meditation, Philosophy, Pranayama, Sanskrit, sequencing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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